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Deployment and Setup

Can ORF filter POP3 or IMAP emails?

No, ORF was designed to filter SMTP traffic. POP3 filtering is only supported if the POP3 downloader re-submits all emails via SMTP. For instance, the Microsoft Small Business Server POP Connector is known to use the Pickup folder for resubmission instead of SMTP, so ORF is unable to monitor such traffic. A possible workaround is using a third-party POP3 downloader which is known to use SMTP for email resubmission (like POPcon), but please note that Before Arrival filtering cannot be used in such setups.

Where should I deploy ORF?

Please consult our Deployment Guide for detailed information on deployment.

How do I convert the trial version to the registered version?

After obtaining the installer of the registered build, you should simply install the registered version "on top" of the trial: the previous configuration will be preserved. It is also recommended to create a backup of your current configuration before the conversion. Step-by-step instructions can be found in our Trial Conversion Guide.

Will ORF work with my anti-virus/anti-spam software?

Yes, there should be no interference. The only thing to consider is the filtering order: ORF will probably have lower priority by default, so it will filter the emails after the other software. You can change this by changing the priorities.

Does ORF support Windows Small Business Servers?

Yes, it does: in fact, a separate edition called ORF Fusion for SBS is available especially for SBS users (with per server licensing). The regular ORF version called ORF Fusion (with per user licensing) also supports SBS.

Does ORF work in an Exchange (failover) cluster?

Yes, ORF can be installed to Exchange clusters. The configuration of multiple ORF instances (installed to each cluster node) can be synchronized automatically in a publisher-subscriber model. For detailed instructions, read our Multi-Server Usage Guide.

Does ORF support non-Exchange servers?

No, it does not, at least not directly. "Exchangeless" Microsoft IIS SMTP Servers are supported, but other servers with their own SMTP engine (MailEnable, Xmail) are not. ORF can be used in such setups with a perimeter IIS SMTP server only, which receives all emails first, then relays filtered emails to the non-Exchange server running at the back-end (see our KB article for detailed instructions).

Can I test ORF without actually affecting emails?

Yes: ORF can run in Test mode, in which it only monitors the incoming email flow and records what it would have done in Live mode without actually rejecting any emails. Alternatively, you can configure it to tag or redirect blacklisted emails instead of rejecting them. See our Testing Guide for detailed instructions.

Does the installation cause any outage of email services?

Under Microsoft® Exchange, the installer restarts the MSExchangeTransport service (Exchange 2016, 2013 Edge and Mailbox server roles, 2010, 2007) and/or the MSExchangeFrontendTransport service (2016 Mailbox server role, Exchange 2013 Client Access server role standalone or hybrid setup) during the installation process. SMTP email transmission will be down while these services are restarting. This usually takes less than a minute (your mileage may vary). It is recommended to schedule the upgrade to a time when the service outage causes the least problems. There is no service outage under Microsoft® Exchange 2003, Exchange 2000 and IIS SMTP.

Just installed ORF - how do I get started?

First of all, we recommend reading the ORF 101 guide, which describes how ORF works. Once you learned the ropes, consult our Best Practices Guide to maximize the filtering efficiency.

Which tests should I enable?

It really depends on your preferences and setup: for instance, the Greylisting test has an excellent catch rate, but it can be utilized only if ORF runs on a perimeter server. It also causes about 15 minutes of delay in the delivery of legitimate emails: some find this acceptable, others don’t. The tests enabled by default are safe to use in any setup, the rest should be enabled only after you made sure it is suitable for your setup and all configuration prerequisites have been made (e.g., enabling the Honeypot test alone won’t do anything, you will need to compile a list of spam trap addresses first). For starters, make sure you read our recommendations.

Which filtering point should I choose?

It depends on your setup: if emails are received directly by ORF (running at the network perimeter), use Before Arrival. If there is another host in front of ORF and emails are received through that, add this host to the Intermediate Host List and use On Arrival. If ORF runs at the perimeter but you also have a secondary MX relaying emails to ORF, add it to the Intermediate Host List and use Both filtering points. For more information, see our Best Practices Guide.

Which DNS Blacklists should I use?

See the list of recommended DNSBLs in our Knowledge Base article and in our Best Practices Guide (Efficient Spam Filtering / Tests: A Starter Plan section).

Which SURBLs should I use?

See the list of recommended SURBLs in our Knowledge Base article and in our Best Practices Guide (Efficient Spam Filtering / Tests: A Starter Plan section).

Deploying ORF in a Microsoft® Exchange 2013 Environment

Introduction

Microsoft introduced several changes in Exchange 2013 which affect ORF deployment. This article aims to provide information and help in different deployment scenarios. The article focuses on Exchange 2013, general deployment instructions are described in the Deployment Guide.

This article provides instructions for ORF 5.3 and later versions: if you have an earlier Exchange 2013-compatible version (ORF 5.2 or 5.1), please consult this KB article instead.

Exchange 2013 Roles

One of the most notable changes in Exchange 2013 is that the five roles of previous Exchange server versions (Edge Transport, Hub Transport, Mailbox, Client Access, Unified Messaging) have been reduced to two (Mailbox and Client Access server roles) in the initial release. The third, Edge Transport server role was introduced in Service Pack 1.

Exchange 2013 SP1 Notes

Please be aware that compatibility with Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 requires fixing a known issue with Service Pack 1 before ORF could be deployed.

Deployment Scenarios

Information regarding the various possible Exchange 2013 setups is available below:

Scenario A:
ORF + Exchange 2013 Edge Transport > Exchange 2013 Mailbox server

Notes

The recommended setup: ORF is installed to the perimeter Edge Transport server in the DMZ, filtering emails before they are relayed to the Mailbox server. As the 2013 Edge Transport server must be linked directly with your 2013 Mailbox server, the Client Access server will be bypassed.

Limitations

Please note that Active Directory-based Recipient Validation is not available on Edge servers, since ORF cannot query the AD from the DMZ. This is usually a non-issue since Exchange has its own recipient validation feature, but the DHA Protection Test of ORF (relying on Recipient Validation) will not work either, unfortunately. Save for these, ORF can filter emails at both filtering points and all other features are available.

Extra Steps

No extra steps required during deployment, simply follow the steps described in our guide.

Scenario B:
ORF + Exchange 2013 Server with both Mailbox and Client Access roles

Notes

ORF receives emails directly with both roles available. Please note that the Client Access server is a domain member, so exposing it directly to the Internet could be a security concern.

Limitations

There are no limitations to speak of: ORF can filter emails at both filtering points and all other features are available.

Extra Steps

If there are any additional perimeter servers, those must be added as Intermediate Hosts. Otherwise, no extra steps required during deployment, simply follow the steps described in our guide.

Scenario C:
ORF + Exchange 2013 Client Access server > Mailbox server

Notes

Please note that the Client Access server is a domain member, so exposing it directly to the Internet could be a security concern.

Limitations

On Client Access servers, only Before Arrival filtering will work. On Arrival filtering and outbound email monitoring (for collecting data for Auto Sender Whitelist) are not supported. Also, as Client Access servers do not queue any emails, the Replay Directory is no longer available under this role (see Extra Steps below).

Extra Steps

ORF relies on the Replay Directory feature in a number of situations, so as a workaround, an SMTP fallback must be configured manually. See the related Help topic for details.

In order to utilize all features of ORF, it is recommended to install ORF on the Mailbox role as well and to use the Configuration Subscription feature to keep the configurations in sync. A shared, external SQL database should be also set up, so both instances could work with the same data. For detailed instructions, please consult our Multi-Server Usage Guide.

If the CAS server subscribes to another publisher server, make sure to localize the settings of the SMTP fallback server (see above), otherwise the default (localhost) server will be used. See the related Help topic for details.

Scenario D:
Exchange 2013 Client Access server > ORF + Mailbox server

Notes

Please note that the Client Access server is a domain member, so exposing it directly to the Internet could be a security concern.

Limitations

On Mailbox servers, only On Arrival filtering and outbound email monitoring (for collecting data for Auto Sender Whitelist) will work, Before Arrival filtering is not supported.

Extra Steps

The IP address of the Client Access server must be added to the Intermediate Host List of the ORF instance running on the Mailbox server.

In order to utilize all features of ORF, it is recommended to install ORF on the CAS role as well and to use the Configuration Subscription feature to keep the configurations in sync. A shared, external SQL database should be also set up, so both instances could work with the same data. For detailed instructions, please consult our Multi-Server Usage Guide.

Scenario E:
ORF + IIS SMTP front-end > Exchange 2013 Client Access server (smart host)

Notes

The IIS SMTP 5/6 Service is a legacy technology, poorly supported by Microsoft® nowadays.

Limitations

There are no limitations to speak of: ORF can filter emails at both filtering points and all other features are available.

Extra Steps

The Client Access server should be configured to relay outbound emails via the front-end server for the Auto Sender Whitelist to work. Apart from that, no extra steps required during deployment, simply follow the steps described in our guide.

What are the system requirements of ORF?

The minimum system requirements for ORF servers are the following:

Requirements
Operating System Microsoft® Windows® Server 2012 R2
Microsoft® Windows® Server 2012
Microsoft® Windows® Server 2008 R2
Microsoft® Windows® Server 2008
Microsoft® Windows® 2003 Server SP1
Windows® Small Business Server 2011 Standard) [1]
Windows® Small Business Server 2008 (latest Service Pack required) [1]
Windows® Small Business Server 2003 R2 (latest Service Pack required) [1]
Windows® Small Business Server 2003 (latest Service Pack required) [1]
Email Server Microsoft® Exchange 2016 (see [4] for compatibility notes)
Microsoft® Exchange 2013 (see [3] for Service Pack 1 compatibility)
Microsoft® Exchange 2010
Microsoft® Exchange 2007 (64-bit release version only [2])
Microsoft® Exchange 2003
Microsoft® Exchange 2000
Microsoft® IIS SMTP Service 6
Microsoft® IIS SMTP Service 5
Platform Both 32-bit and 64-bit [2] OS platforms are supported
Internet Explorer® Microsoft® Internet Explorer® 6 or later
CPU As required by the operating system
Storage Varies, at least 100Mb
RAM Varies, at least 50Mb

[1] ORF Fusion for SBS will run on Small Business Server only. ORF Fusion will run on both SBS and the regular Windows® Server platforms.

[2] Microsoft has released a 32-bit version of Exchange 2007 for lab testing only. ORF is not compatible with this version.

[3] Compatibility with Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 requires installing a bugfix from Microsoft. Learn more about this.

The recommended system configuration is that of Microsoft® Exchange. In overall, introducing ORF to a system that is already capable of running Exchange or IIS SMTP smoothly does not add significant further load to the system. However, estimating the load generated by ORF is very difficult, because it depends much on the features and configuration used.

ORF requires considerable disk space for logs, about 500 bytes per log entry on average. This results in the following average disk space requirements:

Email Traffic Logs for 1 day Logs for 30 days
1,000 / day 488 kB 14 Mb
10,000 / day 4.5 Mb 143 Mb
50,000 / day 24 Mb 715 Mb
100,000 / day 48 Mb 1.4 Gb
500,000 / day 238 Mb 7 Gb

Log retention can be configured in ORF (defaults to 30 days).

Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 compatibility requirements

Microsoft® Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 was shipped with a defect that needs to be fixed before ORF can be used with SP1.

You can download and install the hotfix from Microsoft Knowledge Base article KB2938053.

Compatibility with Exchange Roles

ORF 5.3 and later versions support all three roles available on Exchange 2013 (Edge Transport Server, Client Access Server and Mailbox Server roles). Please see our Knowledge Base article regarding Exchange 2013 deployment scenarios and limitations.

When do I apply the fix?

Apply the fix after Service Pack 1 is installed.

Can I keep ORF installed while upgrading to SP1?

You can keep ORF installed while upgrading to Exchange 2013 SP1, but please be aware that you will not be able to start the Exchange Front-End Transport Service and/or the Exchange Transport Service until the hotfix is installed.

Exchange Services fail to start after installing Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1

Microsoft® Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 was shipped with a defect that prevents third-party Transport Agents like ORF from loading. As a side effect, you may also experience problems with starting the Exchange Front-End Transport Service and/or the Exchange Transport Service.

You may also find errors similar to the one below in the Windows Event Log:

Microsoft Exchange couldn't start transport agents. The Microsoft Exchange Transport service will be stopped. Exception details: Failed to create type 'Vamsoft.ORF.TransportAgents.VSSmtpReceiveAgentFactory' from assembly 'C:\Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion\orftagent15.dll' due to error 'type not found'. :
Microsoft.Exchange.Data.ExchangeConfigurationException: Failed to create type 'Vamsoft.ORF.TransportAgents.VSSmtpReceiveAgentFactory' from assembly 'C:\Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion\orftagent15.dll' due to error 'type not found'.
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.FactoryTable.CreateAgentFactory(AgentInfo agentInfo
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.FactoryTable..ctor(IEnumerable agents, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer)
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.RuntimeSettings..ctor(MExConfiguration config, String agentGroup, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer) at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.MExRuntime.Initialize(String configFile, String agentGroup, ProcessTransportRole processTransportRole, String installPath, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer) at Microsoft.Exchange.Transport.Extensibility.AgentComponent.Load()

Microsoft has released a fix for this issue. Please see our related KB article for more information.

How do I set up ORF for multiple servers?

Please consult our Multi-Server Usage Guide for detailed instructions.

Exchange 2007 Upgrade Information

You have been directed to this page because ORF has detected that you have upgraded to Microsoft® Exchange 2007 while ORF was installed on your computer. Because ORF connects to Exchange 2007 using a different technology than for IIS, Exchange 2000 or Exchange 2003, now you need to connect ORF to Exchange 2007.

Please follow the steps below to connect ORF to Exchange 2007:

  1. Stop the MSExchangeTransport service

    You can do this from the Services MMC, from command-line using

    net stop MSExchangeTransport

    or from PowerShell using

    stop-service MSExchangeTransport
  2. Remove ORF connections from IIS

    Open a command prompt and enter to the ORF program directory (\Program Files\ORF Enterprise Edition by default). Run

    orfinsthelper -uninstallconnector
  3. This will uninstall any remains of the components that bind ORF to IIS. This step is successfull if you get no error messages.

  4. Install the ORF Transport Agents

    From the same command prompt, run

    orfainst -install

    This will install and enable the ORF Transport Agents that bind ORF to your Exchange 2007 Server.

  5. Configuring ORF for Exchange 2007

    Start the ORF Administration Tool and open the Configuration / Global / Microsoft® Exchange page. Click the Detect to automatically detect the Exchange Replay Directory path. Press CTRL-S to save the configuration, then press F11 to start the ORF Service.

  6. Start the MSExchangeTransport service

    You can do this from the Services MMC, from command-line using

    net start MSExchangeTransport

    or from PowerShell using

    start-service MSExchangeTransport

Exchange 2007 Downgrade Information

You have been directed to this page because ORF has detected that you have uninstalled Microsoft® Exchange 2007 while ORF was installed on your computer. If you want to keep using ORF with IIS, Exchange 2000 or 2003, please follow the instructions below to connect ORF to IIS.

  1. Install the ORF SMTP Module

    Open a command prompt and enter to the ORF program directory (\Program Files (x86)\ORF Enterprise Edition by default). Run

    orfsmtpinst -install

    This will install the ORF SMTP Module.

  2. Bind the ORF SMTP Module to IIS

    Start the ORF Administration Tool and select the Configuration / Global / Server Bindings page. Bind ORF SMTP Module to the SMTP Virtual Servers.

    If the ORF Service is already running, press CTRL-U to save the binding changes and to restart the ORF Service.

    If the ORF Service is down, press CTRL-S to save the configuration changes and start the ORF Service by pressing F11.

Deploying ORF 5.2 and 5.1 in a Microsoft® Exchange 2013 Environment

Please consult this KB article for detailed information about deploying ORF 5.2 and 5.1 on Exchange 2013 servers.

Is there a best practices document for ORF?

Yes, it is called the Best Practices Guide. We also recommend reading the ORF 101 Guide, which covers the basics of ORF.

Maintenance

How do I tell what happened to an email?

ORF records the final status of the email in its logs. To check this information, start the ORF Log Viewer tool, load the related log files, search/filter the related entries and check the last, Message column. For detailed usage instructions, please consult the related KB article and the related ORF Help topic.

How do I retrieve blacklisted emails?

Rejected emails cannot be retrieved: they have never arrived. If configured properly, ORF will not blacklist any legitimate emails, so this is usually not a problem, but if you are concerned about false positives and want to review blacklisted emails, you should configure ORF to tag and/or redirect the email to a specified address upon blacklisting instead of rejecting them. If you have Exchange 2003 SP2 or later, you can also configure Exchange to put emails tagged by ORF to the Junk mail folder of target recipient (see our KB article for instructions).

How do I retrieve blacklisted attachments?

Enable the Attachment Quarantine feature of ORF to place blacklisted email attachments in a file system quarantine. Learn more about this feature from this ORF help topic.

Note that this feature was first introduced in version 5.2. In earlier versions, there was no way to retrieve blacklisted attachments.

How do I prevent blacklisting emails accidentally?

Rely on automated tests as much as possible (instead of adding entries manually to the Sender and IP Blacklists). Use only the recommended DNSBLs and SURBLs (see our Knowledge Base article and our best practices guide). Use the Auto Sender Whitelist feature to ensure emails sent by clients and partners (whom your users often correspond with) are excluded from filtering.

How do I improve the performance of ORF?

Read our Best Practices Guide for the recommended settings.

My users seem to receive spam from themselves. How do I stop that?

Read our article for possible solutions: How to blacklist self-spam?

My users are flooded with bounce messages of emails they never sent. What should I do?

This phenomenon is called email backscatter: a spammer is spoofing the email address of your user, so when the target server returns a bounce message, it will land in the inbox of your user. Read our article How to stop backscatter? for possible solutions.

How come the sender address is different in Outlook and in ORF?

Emails have two type of sender addresses: the first is called the SMTP envelope sender address, which is submitted by the sender server in the MAIL FROM: command during the SMTP transport – this is what ORF works with and logs. The other is called the MIME sender address, which is stored in the email header and this is what your email client (e.g., Outlook) shows.

These two addresses match in most cases, but not necessarily: it is absolutely legal to use different SMTP and MIME address information. The Bcc: addressing, mailing lists, CRM software and other systems with automatic bounce-handling often take advantage of this.

Spammers also tend to use different SMTP and MIME sender addresses to confuse the recipient, for example using the recipients own address as the MIME sender address, so it seems the user received the spam from his own address. To blacklist such spam, you should use a Keyword Blacklist expression which checks the MIME header instead of the Sender Blacklist. For detailed instructions, read the Other campaigns: MIME sender spoofing section of our related article).

How do I block attachments based on the file extension?

We recommend using regular expressions: for detailed instructions, read our related KB article.

The Auto Sender Whitelist is overriding my blacklists, what do I do?

In general, whitelists always take precedence over blacklists. In other words, if an email is whitelisted by any tests, it will be excluded from further testing and will be allowed through filtering. The Auto Sender Whitelist test monitors your outgoing email flow and records the addresses to which your users send emails, so when a reply arrives, it will be excluded from filtering. In some cases, the database might get "polluted", e.g., when a user accidentally replies to a spammer. To fix this, the whitelisted address should be added to the exclusion list: see our KB article for detailed instructions.

How do I delete an Auto Sender Whitelist item?

See our related KB article for detailed instructions.

How do I convert my Private Local Database into an External Database?

First, an external SQL database should be set up (see our related guides for detailed instructions), then all records should be migrated from the Private Local Database files to the SQL database using our Database Converter tool.

Where can I get more information about regular expressions?

ORF uses the PCRE engine (Perl-Compatible Regular Expressions), which implements (almost) the same syntax and semantics as Perl 5. Note that it is not the same engine used by Perl, Java or the .NET Framework. Complete documentation is available at http://www.pcre.org/pcre.txt.

Why does ORF talk about recipients instead of emails (Before Arrival filtering point)?

Before Arrival filtering is performed when the sender server specifies the recipient(s) in the RCPT TO: command(s) during SMTP transport (see the Filtering Points Concept Help topic for more information). Each RCPT TO: command specifies a recipient and each time the Before Arrival tests run, so Before Arrival tests may be performed multiple times on a single email. When a blacklisting is triggered, ORF rejects the recipient specified by the sender in the given RCPT TO: command. The sender either specifies another recipient and the Before Arrival tests are performed again, or gives up and terminates the connection.

Due to the above process, ORF could log the email was blacklisted at Before Arrival only if all recipients were blacklisted, but it makes more sense to log the results of each Before Arrival tests per recipient (the way they are performed), instead of logging a message like At Before Arrival, the email was whitelisted for John because the sender is in the Auto Sender Whitelist database, blacklisted for Brian due to a Recipient Blacklist hit, and passed all checks for Mary and Sue for each email.

How do I configure ORF to move spam into the users' Junk E-mail folder?

Consult the following articles, depending on your Exchange version:

What are these .opg files in the ORF directory? Can I delete them?

The .opg files are the so-called ORF PowerLog files: the ORF Service pre-processes these files and generates .ppr files. The latter files are required for the reporting feature of ORF. Once you have their matching .ppr file, the .opg files can be safely deleted. You can also configure ORF to automatically delete them after their pre-processing is finished (Administration Tool: System / Log, ORF PowerLogs - Configure button, Delete PowerLogs after preprocessing).

You can safely delete the .ppr files as well if you do not use the reporting feature of ORF (or disable PowerLogs entirely, Administration Tool: System / Log, ORF PowerLogs - Configure button, uncheck Enable PowerLogs), though these are relatively small files, so might want to keep them in case you need to create reports in the future.

Which DNS Blacklists should I use?

See the list of recommended DNSBLs in our Knowledge Base article and in our Best Practices Guide (Efficient Spam Filtering / Tests: A Starter Plan section).

Which SURBLs should I use?

See the list of recommended SURBLs in our Knowledge Base article and in our Best Practices Guide (Efficient Spam Filtering / Tests: A Starter Plan section).

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting "SERVFAIL, RCODE2" DNS lookup errors

Introduction

This article provides possible solutions to DNS-related problems causing DNS lookups to fail with error message SERVFAIL, RCODE2, which means Server failure - The name server was unable to process this query due to a problem with the name server, which leads to poor filtering performance.

Is my system affected?

Occasional DNS lookup failures are considered normal, because DNS is an unreliable transport. If you see such errors logged only occasionally for the Reverse DNS and SPF tests, but the majority of DNS lookups are successful, there is nothing to worry about.

However, if you see this error logged for DNS Blacklist and SURBL lookups frequently, we recommend giving the below solutions a try:

1. Use the built-in DNS resolver (ORF 5.4 and newer only)

Starting from version 5.4, ORF can access DNS using a built-in recursive DNS resolver, which is not affected by local DNS server problems. Consider switching to this resolver. Find more information on this in the related ORF help topic.

2. Make sure you are using a local DNS server with no public forwarders

In most cases, the problem is caused by public DNS servers (Google DNS servers, OpenDNS servers, ISP DNS servers, etc.) which are used for the queries (either directly, or by forwarding the query through them from the local DNS server). Most online blacklist services (such as Spamhaus) do not accept queries from such public DNS servers (i.e., they return NXDOMAIN to all queries, or refuse to reply and the query times out eventually).

Make sure the DNS server configured in ORF meets all requirements.

3. Try disabling EDNS probes

If the local DNS server uses EDNS, the size of the packets may exceed the limit configured on your firewall. A possible solution is disabling EDNS probes using the following command:

dnscmd /config /EnableEDNSProbes 0

For more information, please consult the related Microsoft TechNet article.

4. Increase the TTL value

When name resolution is provided by root hints, Windows Server 2008 DNS and Windows Server 2008 R2 DNS Servers may fail to resolve queries for names in certain top-level domains. When this happens, the problem will continue until the DNS Server cache is cleared or the DNS Server service is restarted. Setting the TTL to 2 days or higher and flushing the DNS cache may solve the problem.

For more information, please consult the related Microsoft Knowledge Base article.

5. Install a hotfix to eliminate a bug in the Microsoft DNS Server service

Some Microsoft DNS Server service versions are affected by a bug: they cannot correctly handle expired/removed glue records, causing SERVFAIL RCODE2 errors. Installing a hotfix may solve the problem.

We also strongly recommend flushing the DNS cache after applying the above solutions.

6. Verify IPv6 connectivity

If your DNS server thinks it has Internet access over IPv6 when it has none, name resolution may fail with timeout, which results in SERVFAIL errors. This typically affects specific DNS zones and a telltale symptom is name resolution working for a while, then suddenly ceasing to work until the DNS cache is cleared. This can be caused by a combination of the false IPv6 connectivity and a DNS zone which has a different Time-To-Live (TTL) configured for IPv4 (DNS A) and IPv6 (AAAA) authoritative name server data. As Microsoft DNS Server prefers IPv4 over IPv6, lookups work initially, but as IPv4 TTLs expire and Microsoft DNS falls back to the still valid IPv6, the lack of actual IPv6 connectivity will manifest itself as a SERVFAIL error.

If you are seeing this, we recommend investigating why the server believes it has IPv6 connectivity and fix the problem as per the result of your investigation.

Exchange Services fail to start after installing Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1

Microsoft® Exchange 2013 Service Pack 1 was shipped with a defect that prevents third-party Transport Agents like ORF from loading. As a side effect, you may also experience problems with starting the Exchange Front-End Transport Service and/or the Exchange Transport Service.

You may also find errors similar to the one below in the Windows Event Log:

Microsoft Exchange couldn't start transport agents. The Microsoft Exchange Transport service will be stopped. Exception details: Failed to create type 'Vamsoft.ORF.TransportAgents.VSSmtpReceiveAgentFactory' from assembly 'C:\Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion\orftagent15.dll' due to error 'type not found'. :
Microsoft.Exchange.Data.ExchangeConfigurationException: Failed to create type 'Vamsoft.ORF.TransportAgents.VSSmtpReceiveAgentFactory' from assembly 'C:\Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion\orftagent15.dll' due to error 'type not found'.
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.FactoryTable.CreateAgentFactory(AgentInfo agentInfo
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.FactoryTable..ctor(IEnumerable agents, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer)
at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.RuntimeSettings..ctor(MExConfiguration config, String agentGroup, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer) at Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Transport.Internal.MExRuntime.MExRuntime.Initialize(String configFile, String agentGroup, ProcessTransportRole processTransportRole, String installPath, FactoryInitializer factoryInitializer) at Microsoft.Exchange.Transport.Extensibility.AgentComponent.Load()

Microsoft has released a fix for this issue. Please see our related KB article for more information.

I get the error "..." when I try to get ORF’s AD integration work. How can I fix this?

The following Active Directory-related errors may be logged by ORF:

A referral was returned from the server

Solution: make sure that you have a valid LDAP path configured for ORF (Administration Tool: Blacklists / Recipient Validation, Configure selected). Note that LDAP, GC, DC, ORG, etc. has to be written uppercase and no spaces are allowed between the commas.

The authentication mechanism is unknown

Solution: make sure that you have proper authentication information defined, both the user name and password is correct. Note that your server may require the user name in format DOMAIN\username or username@DOMAIN.

Could not bind to path "..."

Solution: check the LDAP path. Note that LDAP, GC, DC, ORG, etc. has to be written uppercase and no spaces are allowed between the commas.

If the above does not help, try the synchronization with and without authentication (also with authentication with blank user information). ORF AD synchronization queries AD-specific properties, so it also requires the AD schema extension by Microsoft Exchange 2016/2013/2010/2007/2003/2000. Synchronization with a regular Active Directory without these schema extensions is not supported.

I see a lot of "Getting rootDSE failed." error messages. What should I do?

This error indicates a problem with the Active Directory connection between ORF and the LDAP server (this is required for the AD-based Recipient Validation test of ORF). By default, ORF tries to find the LDAP root (root DSE) automatically, this works in most cases if that the system where ORF runs is in the domain. This error is logged if this automatic detection fails for some reason. To solve this, you may want to manually specify the root DSE (LDAP path) for ORF in the Administration Tool: Blacklists / Recipient Validation, Configure selected, Directory tab > Use the LDAP root below.

It is also possible that your server requires authentication: please try with user name and password specified for LDAP authentication ( Administration Tool: Blacklists / Recipient Validation, Configure selected, Authentication tab). Note that the user name format required may depend on your AD settings, for example, it can be DOMAIN\user, domain@user or user. Please also try with blank user name and password fields and with authentication disabled.

Fixing corrupted Private Local databases

To repair a corrupted database file, follow the steps below:

  1. Start the Administration Tool and connect to the local or remote ORF instance
  2. Navigate to the page of the related test (Whitelists / Auto Sender Whitelist, or Blacklists / Greylisting, or Blacklists / Honeypot Test, or Blacklists / DHA Protection Test)
  3. Click the Database button, then Manage
  4. Attempt to Repair the database

If the above does not help and you still receiving database related error messages, delete the related .abs file from the ORF directory (Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion by default). Note that this requires the ORF Service to be stopped first, as it locks the database file. The embedded database engine will recreate the database file when the first entry needs to be added to it.

To solve the problem permanently, it is strongly recommended to switch to an External SQL database: setup instructions can be found in our guides. Once the SQL database is set up, you can migrate all data from the Private Local Database files using the Database Converter Tool.

Email notification loop under specific conditions (5.0)

This Knowledge Base article describes a known bug with ORF 5.0.

Description

Due to a bug in ORF, email notifications sent by ORF may trigger further email notifications, eventually resulting in an email loop. This may happen if ORF receives a copy of the email notification by SMTP transmission. In this specific case, the mechanism that should prevent filtering these notifications fails with an error.

Workaround

Configure ORF to submit emails using the Pickup/Replay directory (system default).

  • Start the Administration Tool and connect to the ORF installation
  • Select System / Log in the navigation pane
  • Click the Configure button in the Email Notifications box
  • Select the Settings tab
  • Select the "Default Pickup/Relay folder (recommended)" radio button
  • Click OK
  • Press CTRL - S to save your configuration

Fix

A patch has been released for version 5.0 on September 17, 2012 (orf-5.0-ntlp-patch.zip). To install the patch, follow the instructions of readme.txt from the package.

This bug was fixed in ORF 5.1. ORF 5.1 and later versions are not affected.

Issue Details

Affected Products

ORF Fusion 5.0
ORF Fusion for SBS 5.0

Severity

Minor

Published

Issue published on September 17, 2012.

Why does ORF whitelist emails with blank sender addresses?

You probably have the Whitelist Delivery Status Notifications option enabled (Administration Tool: Whitelists / Sender Whitelist page) in your configuration. Disabling it and saving the configuration should solve the problem.

ORF has this option because it is an RFC standards requirement that every SMTP server must accept Delivery Status Notifications. These emails are sent with blank sender address. To keep your server compatible with the Internet standards, ORF could exclude incoming Delivery Status Notifications (e.g., Non-Delivery Reports) from filtering.

Unfortunately, spammers often try to exploit this requirement by sending spam with blank addresses to avoid filtering, so we strongly suggest not having this option enabled.

All inbound emails are blocked by the RDNS test, what should I do?

This is most likely an issue with the DNS servers specified for ORF. They must be able to resolve external domains recursively (i.e., to return the requested DNS record in a single step instead of redirecting the DNS client to the root DNS servers). Please make sure that all DNS servers configured for ORF satisfy these requirements. To test your DNS server's status, start the ORF Administration Tool, expand System / DNS and click the Health Check button.

Starting from ORF 5.4, you can also use the built-in DNS resolver, which is not affected by DNS server configuration issues.

How did this email get through? I added "..." to the keyword blacklist!

Whitelists take precedence over the Keyword Blacklist test, so first of all, make sure the email was not whitelisted by checking the logs using the Log Viewer. If it was not, check your filter expression: are you absolutely sure it matches the string in the email body? There are a few other things to consider:

When ORF filters HTML emails, the HTML contents are decoded to simple text. As HTML is a rich visualisation medium, built by complex HTML elements, the decoding may produce some unexpected results on occasion. For example, spammers often use white text on white background to confuse the filters which treat the invisible text as actual content, though you do not see it in the mail client. You may filter for the expression No prior prescription required, which has hidden text inside, so the decoded text may look like NoFpriorQprescription33required. Spammers also use HTML tables, images instead of text and other techniques to bypass content filtering.

Also, ORF does not filter embedded emails (such as emails attached to Delivery Status Notifications), so these will not trigger keyword filtering.

My logs are full of "General socket error 0" messages. What should I do?

This issue is caused by a memory leak bug in the Microsoft DNS Server. You can find more information about the problem in our blog. If you experience this issue, please read Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 946565 regarding the fix.

Exchange 2007 Upgrade Information

You have been directed to this page because ORF has detected that you have upgraded to Microsoft® Exchange 2007 while ORF was installed on your computer. Because ORF connects to Exchange 2007 using a different technology than for IIS, Exchange 2000 or Exchange 2003, now you need to connect ORF to Exchange 2007.

Please follow the steps below to connect ORF to Exchange 2007:

  1. Stop the MSExchangeTransport service

    You can do this from the Services MMC, from command-line using

    net stop MSExchangeTransport

    or from PowerShell using

    stop-service MSExchangeTransport
  2. Remove ORF connections from IIS

    Open a command prompt and enter to the ORF program directory (\Program Files\ORF Enterprise Edition by default). Run

    orfinsthelper -uninstallconnector
  3. This will uninstall any remains of the components that bind ORF to IIS. This step is successfull if you get no error messages.

  4. Install the ORF Transport Agents

    From the same command prompt, run

    orfainst -install

    This will install and enable the ORF Transport Agents that bind ORF to your Exchange 2007 Server.

  5. Configuring ORF for Exchange 2007

    Start the ORF Administration Tool and open the Configuration / Global / Microsoft® Exchange page. Click the Detect to automatically detect the Exchange Replay Directory path. Press CTRL-S to save the configuration, then press F11 to start the ORF Service.

  6. Start the MSExchangeTransport service

    You can do this from the Services MMC, from command-line using

    net start MSExchangeTransport

    or from PowerShell using

    start-service MSExchangeTransport

Exchange 2007 Downgrade Information

You have been directed to this page because ORF has detected that you have uninstalled Microsoft® Exchange 2007 while ORF was installed on your computer. If you want to keep using ORF with IIS, Exchange 2000 or 2003, please follow the instructions below to connect ORF to IIS.

  1. Install the ORF SMTP Module

    Open a command prompt and enter to the ORF program directory (\Program Files (x86)\ORF Enterprise Edition by default). Run

    orfsmtpinst -install

    This will install the ORF SMTP Module.

  2. Bind the ORF SMTP Module to IIS

    Start the ORF Administration Tool and select the Configuration / Global / Server Bindings page. Bind ORF SMTP Module to the SMTP Virtual Servers.

    If the ORF Service is already running, press CTRL-U to save the binding changes and to restart the ORF Service.

    If the ORF Service is down, press CTRL-S to save the configuration changes and start the ORF Service by pressing F11.

ORF is letting through lots of spam. How can we catch more?

Please consult the Best Practices Guide and make sure ORF is configured accordingly. If that does not help, use the Log Viewer to check the log entries of spam getting through: it is possible they are accidentally whitelisted (excluded from filtering) either by a manually added whitelist entry, or by the accidental pollution of the Auto Sender Whitelist database (to solve the latter problem, read the related KB article).

You can also contact our Customer Service anytime (be sure to check the "A few tips to get things fixed faster..." link on that page to get an idea what we will need to help you).

I have "Error EABSException cleaning up expired database items. Database: (Auto Sender Whitelist | Greylisting | Honeypot | DHA)" error messages in the ORF logs. What should I do?

Most likely your database file got corrupted (see this article regarding the fix). Such problem may occur if too many emails are flowing through your server (e.g., sending out huge amounts of newsletters), which the embedded database engine of ORF cannot handle (see Which database is best for me? in the related Help topic for more information).

To solve the problem permanently, it is strongly recommended to switch to an External SQL database: setup instructions can be found in our guides. Once the SQL database is set up, you can migrate all data from the Private Local Database files using the Database Converter Tool.

My regular expression does not seem to work... Any thoughts?

The most common mistake is forgetting to "escape" special characters or anchoring the expression, so make sure you test your regex before adding it to your active configuration.

For example, you intend to filter attachments with .exe extension and come up with something like .*.exe. This works nice in the test box, but will also catch the file called monthly executive summary.doc. Why?

In regular expressions, the dot character acts as a wildcard (it matches any character). Accordingly, .*.exe translates to any characters, any number of repetitions, followed by exactly one arbitrary character, followed by the character sequence "exe". The anchor is also missing, so any characters are allowed after the exe character sequence, including cutive summary.doc. The proper regular expression is .*\.exe$, with the "escaped" dot character and with a trailing anchor ($ matches the end of string).

Another typical problem is with the keyword filter expression concepts. Regular expressions in ORF are evaluated on the entire content (not on every single word separately) so the regex cialis may not do anything (except if you want filter emails beginning with this word). The common mistake is adding wildcards improperly, like .*cialis.*. This expression will catch any emails containing the word specialist, because the wildcard will ignore word boundries. Adding \b to both sides of the expression like .*\bcialis\b.* will correct this, so the expression will match the exact word only.

I get "Error EOleSysError updating the MIME information: Library not registered" errors after installing an Exchange update. How can I fix this?

Most likely a service pack or update of Exchange overwrote/broke a CDO registration, which ORF fixed before during installation (read our blog post regarding this). To fix the CDO registration:

  1. Start a 32bit command prompt (Click Start, click Run, type c:\windows\syswow64\cmd.exe, and then click OK)
  2. Run the following command:

    regsvr32 c:\windows\syswow64\cdosys.dll

    If the above does not help, unregister Cdoex.dll and cdosys.dll first:

    regsvr32 /u c:\windows\syswow64\cdoex.dll regsvr32 /u c:\windows\syswow64\cdosys.dll

    Then re-register Cdosys:

    regsvr32 c:\windows\syswow64\cdosys.dll

I added an address to the Sender Blacklist, yet emails from it are still coming through. Why?

Emails have two type of sender addresses: the first is called the SMTP envelope sender address, which is submitted by the sender server in the MAIL FROM: command during the SMTP transport – this is what ORF works with and logs. The other is called the MIME sender address, which is stored in the email header and this is what your email client (e.g., Outlook) shows.

These two addresses match in most cases, but not necessarily: it is absolutely legal to use different SMTP and MIME address information. The Bcc: addressing, mailing lists, CRM software and other systems with automatic bounce-handling often take advantage of this.

Spammers also tend to use different SMTP and MIME sender addresses to confuse the recipient, for example using the recipients own address as the MIME sender address, so it seems the user received the spam from his own address. To blacklist such spam, you should use a Keyword Blacklist expression which checks the MIME header instead of the Sender Blacklist. For detailed instructions, read the Other campaigns: MIME sender spoofing section of our related article).

If the above does not explain the problem, check whether the email was whitelisted using the Log Viewer. If it was not, make sure your Sender Blacklist expression matches the SMTP sender address ORF logged for this particular email.

Why is my ORF SMTP Module "inactive"?

This status does not indicate a problem, it only reports that the SMTP Module has not been loaded by the IIS Administration Service yet. The SMTP Module is loaded first time when an email arrives to the IIS SMTP virtual server you bound the SMTP ORF Module to.

If emails are flowing through the given SMTP virtual server, but the status is still "inactive", open the command prompt, enter to the ORF directory (\Program Files (x86)\ORF Fusion by default) to fix the SMTP Module registration.

For version 4.0 and later, run

orfsmtpinst -install

For a pre-4.0 version, run

regsvr32 orfesmtp.dll

When ORF tags the subject, the email body turns into garbled text. How can I fix this?

When ORF tags the email subject, the encoding of the subject is changed to UTF-8, regardless the original subject encoding. ORF does this because the language of the subject tag and the subject is not guaranteed to be the same (Cyrillic subject tag and Hebrew subject), thus the new subject must be encoded with an encoding that supports mixing various languages and writing systems, like the UTF-8 encoding.

This change made by ORF is correct by the email standards, but Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 has a bug that causes these emails to be displayed garbled in Microsoft Outlook when the message body contains non-English characters.

Microsoft provides a patch and detailed information about this bug in Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 900087 The body of an e-mail message is garbled when the header field and body field are set to different character sets in Exchange Server 2003. If this patch does not solve the problem, try Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 916299 The body of an e-mail message is garbled when the message is viewed in Outlook in an Exchange Server 2003 organization.

All emails are whitelisted and appear to be coming from our Forefront/ISA server, why is that?

In case your Forefront / ISA server is configured to forward requests to Exchange with the option Requests appear to come from the Forefront TMG / ISA Server Computer (SMTP Rules), Forefront / ISA will delete the Received: header lines from the email, removing the email delivery path history. This causes ORF to think the email came directly from the ISA server, as it will not find the original sender (see Header Analysis in the ORF Help).

Change this setting to Requests appear to come from original clients in order to preserve the original headers.

ORF suddenly started catching less spam. How do I fix this?

Check the ORF logs: it is possible that you have accidentally started to whitelist spam, either by adding a manual whitelist entry, or the Auto Sender Whitelist database got “polluted”. See our KB article for solutions to the latter problem.

ORF suddenly started to classify legitimate emails as spam. How do I fix this?

This problem is usually caused by recently added manual blacklist entries. Check the logs to find out which test classifies legitimate emails as spam and modify your configuration accordingly.

I suspect ORF is causing a problem, how do I investigate?

Check the related entries in the ORF logs using the Log Viewer to verify that ORF is causing the delivery issue. If the issue is not related directly to the delivery of emails (e.g., high CPU usage), stop the ORF Service temporary to see if the problem goes away. It is also recommended to check the Windows Event Log entries from the time period you experienced the problem. If none of the above helps, contact us: we are happy to assist in the investigation.

An email I expected did not arrive, how do I investigate?

Start by checking the ORF logs using the Log Viewer to verify the email was blocked by ORF. If not (i.e., no blacklisting is logged), check the SMTP transport logs, the incoming queue and the Junk folder of the recipient. If the email has passed checks (or was whitelisted) at the On Arrival filtering point according to the ORF logs, that means it was allowed through ORF and the problem lies elsewhere. Note that even if ORF allows the email through, that alone does not guarantee its delivery: other software or Exchange itself may still block, alter or divert it.

Updates

Does upgrading ORF cause any outage of email services?

Under Microsoft® Exchange, the installer restarts the MSExchangeTransport service (Exchange 2016, 2013 Edge and Mailbox server roles, 2010, 2007) and/or the MSExchangeFrontendTransport service (2016 Mailbox server role, Exchange 2013 Client Access server role standalone or hybrid setup) during the upgrade process. SMTP email transmission will be down while these services are restarting. This usually takes less than a minute (your mileage may vary).

Under Microsoft® Exchange 2003, Exchange 2000 and IIS SMTP, the installer will shut down the IIS Administration Service and all dependent services while uninstalling the previous version of ORF.

It is recommended to schedule the upgrade to a time when the service outage causes the least problems.

How do I update ORF?

Unlike anti-virus software, ORF does not require downloading any definition updates on a regular basis: the online blacklist databases it uses to identify spam (such as SpamCop and Spamhaus ZEN) are maintained centrally and queried via DNS in real time. This ensures ORF always works with the most up-to-date information available.

The update process of the ORF software itself (when a new version is available) has to be performed manually: no automatic upgrade is available currently. We also suggest updating the DNS blacklist and SURBL definitions after the upgrade as described in our KB article.

Can I upgrade from ORF version X to Y?

Yes, ORF is fully backward compatible and will update any earlier release. The configuration will be left intact, but it is recommended to create a backup before starting the upgrade process. For detailed instructions, consult our Upgrade Guide. It is also recommended to update your DNS and SURBL definitions after the upgrade and to make sure ORF is configured as per our recommendations described in the Best Practices Guide.

Licensing

What are SMAs?

SMAs (Software Maintenance Agreements) allow you to download and use any ORF version released within their validity period. ORF licenses are bundled with SMAs valid for a year, so you are guaranteed to access all versions released within a year after your initial purchase with no further costs.

SMAs can be renewed (currently for an additional year only) within 60 days prior or within one year after expiration. The expiration does not affect your current ORF installation in any way (it will continue to function), and you are also eligible for technical support even after expiration. However, if you intend to upgrade to a more recent ORF version which your latest SMAs do not cover, you should either renew or (if your SMAs expired more than a year ago) purchase new licenses.

How many SMAs do I need for renewal?

You will need to purchase as many SMAs as many users or servers you currently have (depending on your license type). This also applies if you have an ORF Enterprise Edition SMA and you are upgrading to Fusion or Fusion for SBS licensing.

If you need less licenses than you purchased earlier, you should simply purchase less SMAs (e.g., if you purchased ORF Fusion licenses for 100 users initially, but now your company has only 80 employees.)

However, if you want to extend licensing for more users/servers than you currently have, you will need renew all your current SMAs, then purchase extra seats/licenses.

What happens when my SMA expires?

Your current ORF installation will continue to function without any restrictions, you will be able to download the installer of the last version your SMA covered any time from our website, and you will also be eligible for technical support. However, you will not be able to download and install any new ORF versions released after the SMA expiration date.

Can I renew my SMA after it expires?

You can renew your expired ORF Fusion SMA or ORF Fusion for SBS SMA any time after expiration. The renewal can be performed on the Client Portal within a year after the expiration and through our Customer Service if the SMA has expired more than a year ago.

Please be aware that SMAs are chained to each other — a renewing SMA will always start where the expiring SMA ended, regardless of the renewal date. For example, if your last SMA expired on January 1, 2014, the renewing SMA expiration date will be January 1, 2015, regardless the renewal date.

Expired ORF Enterprise Edition licenses cannot be renewed, unfortunately.

Can I have educational / non-profit discount?

Yes, discounts are available for educational/academic institutions and non-profit organizations. Please contact us with your proof of educational/non-profit status (e.g., 501(c) designation letter) to see if you qualify.

How does the 90 day moneyback guarantee work?

If you are not satisfied with ORF and want a refund, please contact our Customer Service within 90 days following your purchase. We will start the refund process immediately, so you will get your money back in full as soon as possible (usually a couple of days, depending on the payment method).

Can you extend my trial period for me?

Request a trial extension from our Customer Service.

How do I upgrade to ORF Fusion with an expired Enterprise Edition SMA?

If you have one or more ORF Enterprise Edition SMAs which expired in the last 365 days, you can upgrade to the new licensing program buy purchasing Fusion or Fusion for SBS SMAs. We provide roughly 30% discount from the list prices for such upgrades. If your ORF Enterprise Edition SMA expired more than a year ago, new license(s) should be purchased in order to upgrade.

Can I convert my ORF Fusion for SBS license to ORF Fusion?

Yes. We provide an opportunity to switch to ORF Fusion (licensed per user) for customers moving away from Windows SBS. We grant a special 50% discount for the conversion. For detailed instructions, please consult our related Knowledge Base article.

How did the licensing change with ORF 5 Fusion?

ORF has been split into two products: ORF Fusion and ORF Fusion for SBS. Both products offer the same, full range of features and services. They are different in their licensing model: ORF Fusion is licensed per user (with unlimited servers). ORF Fusion for SBS is licensed per server and will run on Windows Small Business Server only.

For more complete information, please see the ORF 5 Changes page.

Can I buy SMA for more than one year?

Currently, purchasing SMAs for more than a single year is not possible.

How does the licensing of ORF compare to the competition?

ORF was always the best value product on the market and that did not change. We formulated our pricing and licensing policy to directly beat competitor pricing and to eliminate the annoying (and expensive) hidden charges found elsewhere. Here is a breakdown on how we do it better:

  • Pricing: ORF licenses and Software Maintenance Agreements cost less than any of the major competing product licenses.
  • Performance: No other product achieved 0% false positive rate 5 times in the VBSpam test series - ORF did that with an excellent spam catch rate and with a rather basic configuration (that we barely touched during the testing).
  • TCO: When configuration does have to be touched, ORF goes into great lengths to help the administrator. The intuitive UI of ORF saves administration time and thus money.
  • No Hidden Charge: Fusion's 'per-user' license is per actual person benefiting ORF. Most competing products are licensed per mailbox or define 'users' otherwise.
  • No Hidden Charge: Fusion can be installed on any number of servers. Competitors usually require additional licenses for multiple servers.
  • No Hidden Charge: Our technical support is available even with an expired SMA. Most competitors require you to go through lengthy identification processes and charge a hefty price for help if your SMA has expired.
  • No Hidden Charge: You can let your SMA expire and renew it later with no penalties.
  • Return Policy: We offer a 90 day, no questions asked money-back guarantee for ORF Fusion and Fusion for SBS licenses.

Miscellaneous

What is my Client Portal password?

Registered ORF Enterprise Edition users have their Customer ID (a six-digit identifier) as their password assigned to their registered email addresses by default and will be prompted to change it to something secure upon their first login to our new website. If you forgot your Client Portal password, you can reset it by clicking the Forgot your password? link on the Client Portal login page.

How do I disable Vamsoft email notifications?

Log in to the Client Portal, navigate to the My Client Portal: Profile page using the right-side menu and disable email notifications you no longer wish to receive under News & Notifications.